Sunday, 17 March 2013

Questions Questions - Answers to the questions about Chalk Paint™ decorative paint by Annie Sloan Part 2

***Please note that we have closed comments regarding Chalk Paint. Carte Blanche are no longer stockists and the paint has changed in UK a little and we feel that we can no longer comment accurately about its performance as we could in the past. We hope that the article and comments below are useful but for technical advice we would suggest contacting your local supplier or speaking to Oxford - Annie Sloan Head Quarters***



This is part 2 of a set of answers to questions that I see regularly coming up as search terms in my website statistics with regard to using Chalk Paint™. This set deal with waxing and although I have written an extensive piece about using the wax, here are a bunch of extra things that might I hope answer your queries and stop confusion. I hope I have covered everything and if you have more....just shout and lets see if we can answer them in the comments.
These responses and answers are drawn from my own experience and are my opinions and I am always interested if people can add more from their own experience so if you have more info please feel free to comment.


Antibes Green antiqued with Annie Sloan Dark Wax


  • Can you put a sealer/another paint over wax and Annie Sloan Soft Wax? - No. Annie Sloan Chalk Paint is the only paint product on the market that you can put over wax. And before you ask...even if you only put a little bit on?...NO. And again NO NO NO!!!! let me repeat - Annie Sloan Chalk Paint is the only paint product on the market that you can put over wax. And now please don't tell me you did it anyway and it seemed OK, because it will peel, scratch and other dull stuff. The answer is still NO

  • Can Annie Sloan Soft Wax be used over any paint? - possibly but with no guarantees, it is designed for the soft absorbancy of her own paint
  • Can I tint Annie Sloan Soft Wax? - yes you can, you can actually use the paint to tint

tinting the wax


  •   How long does Annie Sloan Soft Wax need to cure? - this is an odd question because drying and curing are 2 different things. If you are asking how long to leave it before buffing, I normally recommend waiting at least a few hours (vague or what eh?) If you are unsure I would say at least 4 hours. Easiest is to leave it overnight, grab some towelling or cheesecloth and buff. but if you are desperate to finish in the same day then leave it till it stops feeling sticky.

  • Can I paint over Annie Sloan Soft Wax/Annie Sloan Dark Wax? - yes you can with Annie Sloan Chalk Paint™, see the first question.

  • Can I seal  Annie Sloan Chalk Paint™ with shellac so I don't use so much wax? - well, you could, but it is a bit of a silly idea. The wax was created by the manufacturer with the Annie Sloan Chalk Paint™ in mind as a flexible creative sealant and protector. If you paint shellac over the surface then it is sealed. It is sealed with a brittle rigid finish that has no flexibility in finish or style. Shellac doesn't like water much and will bloom.....so you could but for all the cost saving, I can't actually see the point.
  •  How soon after painting should I be waxing? - when you are sure the paint is dry. Dry time for the paint is variable depending on how humid it is and how much air flow you have where you are painting. Air flow helps speed drying in a warm dry atmosphere; humidity is not your friend if speed is on your mind....
  •  Do I need the wax brush - no you don't NEED it ......but you want it I know, it is a lovely tool and will aid your waxing over larger areas
  • What does Annie Sloan Clear Wax do? - it seals and protects, it is water repellent and strong and makes a good connection to the paint and it is a flexible creative material to work with that gives a soft attractive lustre that ages beautifully.
  • What does Annie Sloan Dark Wax do? - You use the dark wax to age and enhance any texture to your paintwork. You apply Annie Sloan Clear Soft Wax first then apply apply Dark Soft Wax. Wipe off any excess, then use the Clear Soft Wax to take more off if you need to.
  • When you wax with Annie Sloan Dark Wax can you just do some areas?- yes, you can use it as much or as little as you want
  • Can you use Annie Sloan Soft Wax over cabinets - yes you can, 3 coats really good protection on kitchen cabinets. Here is what Annie says about it "Refresh every now and again with some more Soft Wax when its needed. Wipe over with a damp cloth to clean. Using a strong cleaner like Mr Muscle may be necessary for stubborn marks but it will remove some wax and the area will need rewaxing."
  •  How much buffing does Annie Sloan Soft Wax require - well, just enough LOL. The more you buff the higher the sheen...so how shiny you want it?? high shine will dull over time but a wee buff will bring it back up....maybe refresh the wax every now and again.....just the same as you would with fine wooden furniture. Like it dull? well don't buff, or buff a bit and allow to dull over time.
  • How do you clean the wax off Annie Sloan Wax Brushes - if your brush is a dedicated wax brush then warm water and soap. If you use the same brush to paint as you do to wax then I would suggest you use a little white spirit to rinse the brush first and then warm water and soap
I hope these tips will help everyone with successful painting and waxing....more than anything Chalk Paint™ is designed to be fun and easy, if it feels difficult then think about changing how you do it...thin the paint maybe, use a brush to apply wax instead of a cloth, keep it simple and fun and please feel free to ask questions about the process here.



137 comments:

  1. Is Annie Sloan Paint only for furniture, is it oil based, can it be used outdoors on a house that is peeling with lead paint. Thank you.

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  2. No it can be used for walls too and timber and it is water based not oil. It can be used outside but peeling lead paint is not a sound substrate to put any paint onto and should be dealt with by a professional in my opinion. Sorry not to be more positive about that.

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  3. I am planning on doing my kitchen cabinets and not waxing but using AS lacquer - do you have any experience with this?

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    1. Hi Kris, first of all I want to check your expectations of the paint. Chalk Paint isn't an eggshell, and we like to say that it will give a look that is perfectly imperfect....it is designed to patina and have texture and interest. If you want a perfect paint smooth paint finish that will remain that way then I suggest you pick another paint.
      Secondly with cabinets you need to scrub them really really well, every single grease spot needs to be removed particularly if you are varnishing rather than waxing as the varnish/lacquer will draw the grease to the surface and you will see every spot of grease rise to the surface. Now if I am worried about grease I do the finish in my "barnworn" effect, where I create quite a rough surface finish and then paint and stipple a second colour (sticking with strong or dark colours over, missing a little here and there...then I sand back a little at the missed areas and varnish and it looks great but it is the rough country "found this in a barn" look that makes it work even with grease and all sorts.
      Now to AS lacquer; I won't lie I am not a huge fan. I have never liked it very much because I think it is hard to use well as an amateur except as a floor lacquer. Now...don't necessarily take notice of me, I know lots of people who love it. Here are the things to watch - if you are painting it over 2 coats of the paint on a vertical surface then it can dry REALLY quickly, and overworking can make it drag and look nasty, so buy a really good brush and be efficient and clean about your application. Be careful of shaker doors or fielded and raised panels and applying too heavily, the varnish can pool at the bottom and that isn't a good look either.
      My recommendation would be to have a practice before you start and make sure you are happy. Try out how many coats it takes to stop grease penetrating and so on.
      Of course the great thing about Chalk Paint is that if it all gets beetroot juice spilled down it you can block the stain with shellac, whip out the paint brush and paint it again and for next to nothing!!!
      Just be clear what your expectations are.

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  4. What happens when I need/want to repaint my cabinets in the years to come? Can I sand them and repaint with something else? From your first answer it sounds like I can only repaint my cabinets with Annie Sloan paint....forever and ever. That scares me a little :)

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    1. Lorie, you would just need to get all the wax off. There isn't another decorative paint that will just go straight over wax.

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  5. When I applied my wax I could see lines. I applied a small amount and it isnt "sticky" but rather a smooth wax feel, but I can still see my buff lines. Is this normal? How can I get rid of them?

    Thank you.

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    1. Hi, sorry to be slow in posting your question and responding, I've been away up North for a few days.
      The lines should fade with time but make sure you didn't buff too soon.....you need to leave it to harden off.
      To get rid of the lines just mix some paint with the wax and apply that over anywhere that needs stuff blending out, allow it to harden off and then buff lightly

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  6. I have painted an old Lloyd Loom ottoman with Annie Sloan paint(very watered down) and it looks good but I am wondering about using soft wax on it to finish off. The wickerwork took me ages to clean by poking inter dental brushes through the holes and I am worried that the soft wax will just clog up the holes again.
    Any ideas? I need to seal the chalk paint and also waxing darkens the paint and I want the ottoman to match other painted pieces in the room.

    I thought about using varnish over the chalk paint but that probably will yellow the colour. So is waxing the best option and how can I avoid clogging the holes of the wickerwork?

    Any ideas appreciated,

    Thanks.

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    Replies
    1. I am so sorry, I answered this days ago...or so I thought on my iPad but it seems not to have appeared.
      If the paint is very watered down and you have only done one coat you may find that it comes out a little patchy when waxed or varnished - just to give you the heads up.
      Wax could be carefully stippled over the surface however I agree it may clog. The product I would probably turn to would be Polyvine Wax Varnish - which isn't a wax just looks like wax when it is dry - if you are in UK you can buy it from us ...look for the "Shop Here" on the RHS of this blog and you can get it in our shop.
      I would stipple it on to the surface lightly and then it won't run.


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  7. I did the paint and then the wax. like it after done, but i did this on a coffee table and we put our feet on it. end result it has rubbed off all the was and the color is the color without the wax. at this point i hate it. and want it all off and i want to put paint on it. what can i do other then talking everything off. I dont want to keep waxing,

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    1. If the wax is all off hot water and a scrubbing brush will remove the paint.
      If you want to put another paint on top you MUST remove all the wax as the only paint that sticks to wax is Chalk Paint.
      On areas that you have still got wax on you can wash down with mineral spirits (aka white spirit for those in the UK) and then scrub.

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  8. Please can you tell me how I clean and care for my furniture painted with AS? Can I polish with normal furniture polish etc? thank you x

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    1. If your furniture polish is free of silicon then I can't see any issue. You can wipe the surface clean of finger marks etc with a gentle detergent on a soft cloth - never use an abrasive cleaner on painted furniture. I would wipe clean first then polish. If the wax dulls then rewax.

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  9. Thanks for your reply! One more question please! I want to paint a chair a pale lemony colour, I've been advised to use a mix of English Yellow and Pure, however I'm a bit scared as english yellow is quite a strident colour (that I definitely would not use anywhere else as it is) and I don't want to buy 2 tins if pale quite soft lemon can't be acheived, any thoughts if it's possible? thank you! x

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    1. I think I would recommend Old White and English Yellow or Original and English Lemon depending on your own preference.
      I think Pure and English Yellow will make quite an acid lemon and unless you are a Pure White sort of person I am not madly keen on Pure - TBH I have never used it on a project and it is the one colour in the range that doesn't cover very well.
      Old White is a slightly grey green white and this will give a softer tone - the Old White is my favourite white to have kicking around and really useful for other projects.
      The Original would be a little warmer - it is a slightly pinky warmer white and this would take the edge of the acid in a warmer way. Original is the most popular colour countrywide. I would pick a full tin of your favourite white and then a sample pot of the yellow. If it is a chair I reckon you would easily get enough out a sample and some added white to cover it.

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    2. Thanks very much, I appreciate the reply..I've just finished revamping a bed and two chests of drawers with the Original and am very pleased with it! x

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    3. Sorry....that wasn't meant to say "English Lemon"....English Yellow is what it should read

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  10. I used ASCP over a few really rough items such as an old barn ladder, a really old frame, and another extremely old item. The wood, due to its age, has a lot of cracks and is very dry so it soaked up the paint just as I wanted. Should I still wax over these items even if I love the way it currently looks or can I leave it as is?

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    1. the wax is a protective layer making it wipeable, if you aren't going to be wanting to wipe it clean then I would just keep them as they are ...if it came to the bit and they got grubby you could wash them and some of the paint would come off...then you could just paint them again

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  11. Does Annie Sloan Chalk Paint need a wax on furniture? What is it that the wax does for the paint and is there possibly a substitute we could otherwise use to seal the paint?

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    1. The wax seals the paint. It is water soluble and easily marked without it. You can seal it with a varnish. Some varnishes work well and others don't. Are you in USA or UK....if so I can give some recommendations.

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  12. I just recently painted my dining room table with chalk paint and I went over it with wax. I went to go wipe it down after dinner with a damp cloth and the paint came off onto the cloth. Did I do something wrong? How do you keep that from happening??

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    1. Sounds like not enough wax on there. Or else there was some paint caught in the wax. If you sanded after waxing and then waxed again then there might just be some pigment caught in the wax coat.
      I would give it another coat of wax.

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    2. I also just painted my kitchen table and plan to distress it. I applied one coat of paint and one coat of wax so far. II applied the wax in mall sections and removed the excess wax within minutes using a soft cloth. There was definitely paint pigment on the cloth. Is this normal? How many coats of paint and wax should I apply to a kitchen table? The paint on the chairs is easy to scrape off with my finger nail!! Why and is there anything I can do to stop that? I painted it all two days ago.

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    3. Elizabeth, sorry to be so slow to respond.
      Unfortunately sometimes the paint does bleed colour out especially the reds. I think I have said on other posts that I am not a great believer of putting wax on a family kitchen table as it isn't the most durable but as you have started I would carry on as you cannot lacquer or varnish over wax.
      You can do as few or as many coats of paint as you like. The wax will need to be up to 6 coats for full durability and you will need to allow it to cure. Sorry, it may take a while to harden.

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  13. I have follow every direction and furniture ia a cloudy blotchy mess from the wax. I put it on thin and wiped excess(which is not easy as the wax drags and dris quickly . have tried with rag and brush .

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    1. Hi where are you? I am surprised at the wax drying quickly...it shouldn't. I think you need to maybe go back to your retailer and see what they think. Cloudy sounds like too much wax...but you say it is a thin layer. Without seeing it I don't know that I can help this time. Sorry

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  14. Hi. I've painted some outdoor furniture with Annie Sloan but don't like the finish. It looked really good at first but now it's flaking. Can I paint over the furniture with some other outdoor wood paint? PS: furniture has not been waxed.

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    Replies
    1. Sand away the loose and flaking paint back to a sound surface and then paint away with your next process.
      I would perhaps prime it to solidify the Chalk Paint

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    2. Sorry...I meant if there is a lot of the Chalk Paint left

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  15. Kitchen cupboards!
    Hi, I have been reading with interest your advice on Kitchen cupboards. I'm just in the midst of painting my cupboards with country grey and wondered if you could advise me in the waxing. I note that you suggest three coats of wax; firstly, does the colour come up darker the more wax that's put on? I quite like the colour as it is and don't really want it to become too much darker; secondly, do you buff only at the end or between coats? And finally, do you wait for each coat of wax to completely dry before doing the next coat?
    Thanks very much
    Victoria

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    1. Annie's recommendation is 3 coats of wax. The colour will darken when the wax is fresh but it should as the solvent is slowly evaporated off the surface return to it's original tone. The sheen of course will be slightly different.
      Buff only the last layer and let each layer harden off before you go with the next one as otherwise the solvent in layer 2 will just soften layer 1 and you don't end up with 2 layers, just 2 lots of wax melded into one

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  16. Thank you so much, I really appreciate your advice.

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  17. Hi Cait,
    Thank you for all the information you give out on here. Greatly appreciate your generousity.
    I am a new user of the AS paint and wax. You mention that on high usage surfaces the recommendation is to use 3 coats of the clear wax and buff only the last coat...
    Do i need to lightly sand in between applying each coat?
    Secondly:
    Would you say any table top or unit where items are placed on its top surface be classed as high use? e.g Chest of drawers, bedside table, work desk. Or rather what you you define as high usage on a surface?
    Many thanks for your time. Karen

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    Replies
    1. Annie's recommendation is to use 3 coats of wax. No need to sand between coats at all; and yes, tabletops can take a lot of abuse. I think you just have to make a value judgement with each piece you do. Chests of drawers are not too bad but beware anything with alcohol or oil in it - eau de toilette, perfume, cleansers etc. These can break down the wax very quickly and leave damage, and oily items will mark the surface. On my dressing table I have a lovely Italian tray which has all my creams and perfumes on.
      When using the wax work in small areas working the wax in well...think of it like hand cream, if you had too much handcream on your skin would be sticky and unpleasant and the wax is similar, so make sure you wipe away any excess. Leave it to harden off between coats
      Hope that helps

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    2. Yes, that really does help Cait. Thank you.
      In applying the 3 coats of wax, would the colour and hue of the surface or the sheen on the surface, be noticably different to the other areas of the piece and look 'odd'?

      Would you ever Polyvine Matt Wax Varnish or use AS varish on the high usage table top instead of waxing in 3 coats. And then just one coat wax the other areas on the piece?
      And if one did would the surface colour and finish look very different to the other areas of the piece that have jst been waxed once? All best karen

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    3. No the look won't be any different as long as you do all the surfaces properly
      We do use the Polyvine for some surfaces and we sell a lot of it, the mid sheen is more durable than the matt. It is not the most hardwearing varnish but it is easy to use and has a very attractive finish. I do not and never have liked the AS varnish and don't recommend it for anything other than floors. I prefer Blackfriars Duratough. If you wax one surface on a piece then wax all.....varnishing one will look odd, unless you had the top a different colour, which would work well as you wouldn't see the difference.

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  18. Sorry Cait I forgot to enquire in your judgement would solid wood dining room chairs - that are being used daily need 3 coats of wax?
    And what about items that are being moved about in the house regularly? Would they too easily get marked, finger prints etc. I suppose I am not yet certain of how vunerable the wax finish is. Thank you Karen

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    Replies
    1. Karen it is really hard to say, we have chairs in the studio that we use every day and some have had 1 coat and they are fine after a year. Wax doesn't like oil or grease...you can wipe off fingermarks and if you clean regularly then you will need to apply a maintenance coat of wax as it is a sacrificial coating and needs to be reapplied. Alternatively just varnish them.
      Some families are very hard on their furniture and others aren't so only you really will know.
      Waxed items just need to be treated with respect.

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  19. OK Cait. Thank you very much for taking the time to give your advice.
    I really appreciate it. Karen

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  20. If painting an old wood table & chairs to be used outside on a screened in porch, do I need to seal the paint w/anything? The sales clerk told me not to wax it if I was using it outdoors beacuse it would make wax sticky.

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    Replies
    1. No don't use wax, wax is not suitable as an outdoor coating and may present a number of problems down the line.
      If you just leave the furniture untreated.....it will weather pleasantly over time. The one colour though I would beware of is Reds for chairs, they seem to leach colour a good bit.
      Beware of painting teak, it is rally too oily to take the paint well

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  21. Hi This is a great site! I am new to all this and I just recently painted an armoire using oil based satin enamel white paint and it looks too sterile and I want to paint over it with the chalk paint to make it look distressed and old. How do I go about using this paint over this type of surface? Thanks in advance.

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    1. Thank you Stotmom, glad you like it.
      There is an interesting way to work over an oil based paint....very easy. Pick our colour and paint it straight over....no sanding, nothing. I know, that sounds odd, but honestly any prep is going to wasted on a satin. Once you have painted it, you can use a damp cloth to work off the paint as opposed to sandpaper ......it will gently distress and no dust!!!!! Let itall dry hard and then wax

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  22. Hi, I just painted a chair with ASCP and I would like to paint on top of the AS paint a whimsical design. I have a lot of acrylic craft paint in lots of bright colours. Can I use the acrylic paint over the chalk paint? It would only be a decoration. I then would finish with the soft wax.

    Thank you so much for your time... Beth

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    Replies
    1. It should be absolutely fine Beth. The acrylic paints won't absorb the wax and may sit a little proud of the Annie Sloan Paint but it will be fine.

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  23. Hi, I'm waxing my kitchen cupboards (they're painted with Annie's chalk paint) I tried a few with dark wax and don't like how they look. How can I remove the dark wax? sanding? or just repaint over the wax?
    Thanks!

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    Replies
    1. Gosh I am so sorry to be so slow to reply, we are overwhelmed with work at the moment and so please forgive me.
      White spirit (aka mineral spirits if you are in the USA) will take of the wax or you can sand or recoat. I personally would probably wipe down with white spirit to remove most of it and then pop a quick fresh coat over. Then you are not painting over relatively fresh wax which is still a little soft

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  24. hi I wanted to paint my children's outside wooden playhouse, can I just use the chalk paint straight on and will it be weather proof then.

    Many thanks

    Sarah

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    1. Hi Sarah, I have a sort of dilemma with this question.
      Annie Sloan's website says to just use the paint and leave it. This works with most of the colours providing the timber is very dry and allowed to dry inside for a period of a few days. It will then harden off and will achieve that pretty faded slightly flakey look that French shutters have .....you need to imagine that this is the look that you are after....this is not a normal shed paint, it will "weather"
      Now, there are a few things for outside furniture that you need to really watch. This doesn't always work well on pressure treated timber and if you use the reds then the pigment can leach onto clothes when it is freshly done....as can some of the other colours. It doesn't work on Teak furniture (I realise your wee house won't be teak but I thought I would drop that in). It does work well on lots of plastics surprisingly.
      My advice would be to do a wee test area and see if you like it. I am sure you are desperate to just get it done before the end of the summer....but it might be an idea just to see what you think before you do the whole thing.

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    2. Sorry...I'll just clarify; it will achieve that pretty faded slightly flakey look that French shutters have *over a period of time* and the colours that can leach are usually the strong ones...depends on the batch as to whether it will or not. I had one batch of Greek Blue that leached and the next lot didn't

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  25. Can I paint a cabinet using a water based paint and then use Annie's white paints to create a wash over it?

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    1. You can but I am not sure why you wouldn't do it all in Annie's paint....if you paint your cabinet in other water based paint you will need to sand and prime it before painting....with Annie's paint you would cut out the prep.
      If you are happy doing the prep then it all depends on the look that you want to go for as to whether Annie's paint is right for the job. But yes you could use Chalk Paint. Remember that you would need to wax it to seal the surface afterwards

      I personally would probably use General Finishes if I was using a normal acrylic paint to basecoat - the have a basecoat called milk paint and a white glaze which gives you you wash.....

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  26. What sealant can I use over ASCP and dark wax. Painted a vanity top and it scratched a teeny bit. I need to harden and waterproof. What do you recommend?

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    1. There is no clear varnish or paint that can be applied over wax other than ASCP. That is what makes ASCP unique.
      You can rewax the scratches with Annie Sloan Wax, and take it from there. Alternatively you can remove the wax and varnish.

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  27. Hi.
    Wondering if you can help me with a solution to a project Im currently working on.
    Ive just painted a dresser in the wonderful ascp. The legs of the dresser is made up of some sort of plastic and metal (prob brass). I want to gild the legs solidly with imitation (dutch) gold, with preferably acrylic size. My question is, can I paint the legs with chalk paint . shellac,then gild, or will it be too absorbent ? I prefer not to use the oil size as I'm painting at the clients house, but if needs must!
    If it is possible what protective coat would you recommend.

    thanks for any help you can give

    regards
    Marina

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    Replies
    1. Hi Marina,
      Annie's acrylic gold size will go straight over the chalk paint - because of it's composition it sits "on" the paint and works relatively well but on the legs of a piece I would worry about using acrylic because it never cures and if it gets a ding then the gold tends to tear and go through to just sticky size that will attract dirt. If you don't think it's going to get damaged then go for acrylic
      For all the smell a little bit of oil size will cause....if it were me I would shellac and use an oil size.

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  28. Thanks Cait for getting back so promptly.Would you therefore use a oil based primer and one shot, or could I get away with painting in chalk paint and sealing with shellac? greatly appreciate your advice. thanks Marina

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    1. I think the latter would be fine, if it was real gold I might go with the former but for schlag I wouldn't bother.

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  29. Does Annie Sloan make a brush for painting and a different brush for wax?

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    1. She has a brush for painting which is a lovely Italian made bristle brush. She did have a wax brush that came from USA but I see she no longer does them. We stock them in 2 sizes, I will put them on the website today if they are not there already. I believe she found her supplier was not very reliable

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  30. This site is brilliant! I am new to Annie Sloan paints but totally addicted. I have just painted some outdoor wrought iron furniture, do I need to seal with wax or not?

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    1. Glad you like it
      You can leave it unsealed and it will weather naturally or you can seal it with General Finishes Exterior 450 varnish. This is available in UK and USA, and if you are in UK you will get a promotional gift if you let them know you are one of our friends!! tell them Paintycait gave you their name.

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  31. Would you please let me know how much chalk paint to mix with the soft wax

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  32. If you copy and paste this link into your browser you will see my friend Virginia doing it very nicely on youtube
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mEKJo7yzfx8
    Not much at all ....as you will see

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  33. I have just painted my first piece with AS chalk paint, a bedside pot cupboard, and it has got bleed through! I see that I should use shellac to seal it. I have been everywhere but no one seems to sell shellac. There is Colron French polish that contains shellac. Would this do or could I just use a primer or undercoat? I have done distressed finishes before using plain old Matt paint with great results. Feeling a bit disappointed with AS paint after all the hype !

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    1. Hi there,
      Yes French Polish is fine - I use Colron and Liberon currently, but any pale shellac based polish or knotting (not sanding sealer as this has an extra ingredient that interferes with paints) should be fine.
      If you have waxed already, sand off the wax and apply over the affected area then recoat and wax. You can use a stain blocking primer like Zinsser Bin (also shellac based) or an oil based primer or undercoat but it needs to be the opposite composition to the stain so if it is a water soluble stain it will bleed through most water soluble primers and undercoats. Shellac dries in 15 minutes and blocks both oil and water based stains - easy and cheap to resolve. I have to tell you that had you used normal Matt paint the bleed would have happened to that too. If you had used an acrylic it may have been held back.

      At the end of the day AS Chalk Paint is just paint - however it is a flexible paint capable of doing lots more than just a sanded distress. Matt paint has no adhesion properties to make it stick to slicker surfaces - although you can get it to stick to some depending on your knowledge and experience - so what makes AS special is its versatility and as an entry level product for those that have never painted before it means the applicator doesn't have to understand any of the technical stuff so it is quite liberating.

      Having been a decorative painter for 28 years I think I have seen and been asked to fix just about all the DIY disasters possible that using other paints to attempt decorative finishes can produce. Some work out well but when they go wrong it is often expensive and messy to put right. There is never really a total disaster with ASCP.

      Hope you get the bleed sorted.

      Cait

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  34. Hi Cait, I notice for a sealer on a few of these questions you don't mention the beautiful products. They seal outdoor furniture from weather I am told as well as a sealed matte finish for indoor furnitures. I buy it at the retail store that I purchase all my AS Chalk Paints. Are you not an advocate of this product too or have you never
    tried them. I ask because I am about to use the Matte furniture seal on a night stand for a different look in that room. Please give your expert opinion on these products too. Thanks in advance!

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    1. Hi there
      I have actually mentioned the range in one lot of my answers, but they are a US range and we are a UK company and they are not available in this country. I often answer a question and then suggest that people get back to me with the region they are writing from so I can suggest country specific systems and would if relevant suggest them

      I was aware the Beautiful range was coming before it arrived (I mean before it was even called Beautiful) as I know their creator Mindy Harrel as an e-buddy of many years. I remember her very early on saying that she was working on developing top coats for the Chalk Paint I know that Mindy researched the product line that she created to a very high degree and I also know that she tested it extensively before making any claims about it.
      I have heard a lot of very very good things regarding these products, but I have no personal experience of them and knowing Mindy I would expect nothing less than greatness LOL.

      If you do use them please do come back and tell me more of your experience and thanks for posting about the range.

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  35. Hi Cait, this is a wonderful blog and by the looks of things a lifesaver for DIY enthusiasts. My question is this- my husband doesn't like the feel on my recently finished chalk paint dining table. Can I put a varnish over the wax too make it feel less chalky to the touch?
    Thank you again, your answers above are so helpful!

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    Replies
    1. Unfortunately not - you cannot put anything over wax except Chalk Paint. You can paint it again and varnish it but if you put varnish over the wax it will peel off.

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  36. Hey, I'm really hoping you can help! I recently undertook my first project with ASCP and all went well. The coffee table has been sat in my front room for a few weeks with no issue. However, today my baby left crisps crumbs on the top and now there's a smattering of grease across the it. Surely this can't be right, can it? People paint and wax tables and chairs all the time with ASCP and clearly there must be times at the dinner table when grease gets onto it. Everything went so smoothly during the process that I'm struggling to see what I done wrong. I cannot seem to find anything online on what it takes to care for Annie Sloan painted and waxed furniture and whether things such as grease will penetrate. I am due to paint and hopefully sell a table and chairs set and I don't want the buyer to encounter this problem; as its a pretty major issue for a dining room table and chairs! Thank you so much for any assistance you're able to offer, I appreciate it Xx

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    Replies
    1. All solvent borne beeswax absorbs grease. Many acrylic varnishes also absorb grease. We have a small piece of paper inside or attached to each piece of waxed furniture we sell that says -

      "Care of Painted Furniture
      Hand painted furniture should be loved! We suggest that it should be treated the same way as you would an antique. Use mats for hot dishes and mugs. Wash with a microfiber cloth and if necessary a mild detergent. Do not use abrasive clothes or cleaning products. Use the sample of wax supplied to repair and renew the surface"

      I never recommend the wax as a suitable product for a kitchen table top.

      Sorry.


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    2. Thank you so much for such a prompt response. This is all new to me so I am learning as I go. The table top has been stripped back to bare pine and, although I do not intend on painting it, I was going to just wax - but now I'm thinking that might not be advisable for a table. Is there anything out there that IS grease repellent as a protectant? Or is that a silly question? Every table I've ever owned hasn't absorbed grease and I've been able to just wipe it over and the surface is perfect, so I'm wondering what's so different about THOSE table tops and what they use? Sorry to be a pain, but this blog is helping me to understand a few things LOL, Em x

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    3. Commercial table tops are normally finished in a cellulose lacquer. This is not a DIY product, however a good Polyurethane (white spirits/mineral spirits clean up) or a high quality Polyacrylic (water clean up) will give a good, durable finish.
      Alternatively you can use a counter top finishing oil. These are solvent based and take some time to cure,
      If you have sanded the top, my favourite finish is to use the ASCP thinned and wash the surface so you get a woodwash. Then finish with a finishing oil.The oil and the varnish give a different look to the paint than the wax does so I tend to do a different finish so that this isn't obvious

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    4. Thank you SO much; so helpful and lots to think about. v. grateful, Em x

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  37. Would you recommend using a varnish or the AS wax for a dining table (painted with AS pure white and no distressing)? If so, which varnish? How many coats of the varnish? And how long do we have to wait until it is safe to eat off of? Also with the wax—how long would you have to wait before the wax has completely set?

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  38. I would use 2 coats of High Performance Topcoat from general Finishes. We recommend this product as it is very good but also available in USA, UK and Europe. If you are buying from UK please use the code CARTEBLANCHE2013 in the check out special instructions box and they will send you a free applicator. However, the best thing to apply with is the paint pad they supply. Goes on beautifully. I would thin the 1st coat over AS by about 10% . It is safe to eat off as soon as it is dry....if you are thinking of food safe. It won't cure for about a week, so just be careful.
    Annie Sloan paint wouldn't be my first choice fora table top. If you have loads of kids and the table will be used hard then I would maybe think again. If it is an occasional use table should be great. The Pure doesn't cover brilliantly and you are best to give it a coat of Old White First if you have some lying around. Otherwise don't be surprised if it takes 3 coats
    Wax takes about 5-7 days to harden completely

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  39. Hi Cait,
    I'm about to paint a dresser with Annie Sloan Duck Egg Chalk Paint. I wasn't able to buy the Annie Sloan wax. Do you think I could just buy another wax at Home Depot? If you have any other recommendations let me know. The Annie Sloan shop is a bit too far out for me. Thank you so much!

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    Replies
    1. I am really sorry I am afraid I have no idea what waxes Home Depot has as we don't have that store in UK.
      Fiddes soft wax, Liberon?????....and there may be others that do a beeswax and carnauba mixed wax....these may be OK (PLEASE NOTE these are just suggestion I HAVE NOT TESTED THEM) so test first. I would personally order on-line and for all the cost of a tin of wax being sent, aren't you better just buying that and then not wasting money on something that may not work

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  40. Can you please tell me if after I paint my cabinets, do I sand first and then wax or vice versa? I'm going for the distressed look, but not sure in what order.

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    1. You can do either. Annie likes to sand after the first wax. The reason is that if you do it before it is less controllable. You sand and think it is perfect .....you wax and realise you have removed way more than you thought. It is also very messy to do it before. There will be a lot of dust. If you wax after you get crumbs not dust and you can *see* what you doing.
      Why not practice on the back of a door. That way you can try out both ways. If you sand after first wax you will sand off some wax.....you then need to rewax

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  41. Please Help, I created A Beautiful Outside Door Today Before Finding This Blog, Too Late. The Door Is Red With Dark Wax & I Love The Look. I Was Told At The Store Where I Purchased The AS ProductsThat I Could Cover Them With Clear Coat To Protect Finish. After Reading, It Seems That Info Was Not Correct. Is There Any Way To Protect This From The Elements In SW Montana, A Rather Harsh Environment? Thank you

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    Replies
    1. You cannot varnish over wax and the wax won't last one winter in Montana. Wax is NOT an exterior finish and you should speak to your supplier as you we're miss-sold. You need the wax off - remove with Mineral Spirits. Then repaint then if you want the dark wax *look* I would advise using the Beautiful range of glazes and then seal with an exterior varnish such as General Finishes Exterior 450

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  42. Hi Cait, I did your class about a year ago but never got round to doing any painting - now I see you don't sell the Annie Sloan paint any more - where can I buy the kit locally?

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    Replies
    1. The lovely Lou Shaw of Kit and Caboodle in Newburgh is the nearest Find her on Facebook to get her hours etc. or give her a wee call 01337 842278 / 07891563201

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  43. Hello Cait, thanks for your great informative blog.
    I paint a fair amount of dressers and furniture using mainly AS "Old White" and over time I have found the whole waxing process a little upredictable. Quite often the wax will take of paint (particularly in the corners) which annoyingly means having to paint over the wax again, and then re-wax. I'm wondering what your experiences are with using clear varnish directly over say 2 coats of AS paint? Do you feel it will be as durable? I'd love to know if you have any recommendations as to what varnish (water based??) would be a good option? Thanks

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    Replies
    1. There are a number of varnishes that work well.....but I dont know where you are in the world so I will throw a few names around.
      General Finishes available in UK, EU and USA make a great range of great varnishes...very durable and easy to use but I reckon 2 coats to get a nice even sheen - HP Topcoat is my favourite and it is tough as old boots, comes in 4 different sheens. Next in Line is Blackfriars Duratough, the matt is truly excellent and I love it for high traffic areas like bathrooms and kitchens but this is a UK product, Polyvine is available in UK, parts of USA and a lot of EU and the wax varnish that they do is great...easy to apply, long open time and a wax like appearance.....but not as tough as the other 2
      Hope that helps!

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    2. Oooh almost forgot but if you are stateside look at Beautiful by Harrell Art Group, they do a great range of associated products for ASCP

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    3. Thanks Cait for your swift reply..I am in the UK actually..and will definitely look into your suggestions.

      Do you think these finishes are fine to go straight over Annie Sloan chalk paint then once it is dry? Would it seal the paint in the same way and have the same durability that wax does? I'm curious if they would actually be a stronger finish than wax?

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    4. These do go straight over ASCP and they just behave differently from wax. It is a different type of wearing, and obviously it be a hard coating might chip where the wax wouldn't being a soft coating. Annie uses her varnish over the paint on floors....works very well....I just don't like her varnish.

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  44. I tend to agree, it's just a shame that the AS varnish is so expensive, so I will will test out a piece with your suggestions.I realise that many folk may deem this 'pointless' but I suppose a layer of wax could be applied over the varnish just to add a further layer of protection, and it would be relatively easy to apply. Thanks for being so helpful Cait..

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    Replies
    1. Her varnish isn't really expensive at all....but I don't rate it. It is hard to use and yellows. With so many really excellent products available I am never sure why she has stuck with this one, but there we are. The other thing is that the varnishes I have suggested come in smaller quantities.
      Waxing over the top is in fact pointless. Wax needs to be absorbed. It will just sit on the top of the varnish and do nothing. the only advantage it has is to offer the same sheen to a surface where you have waxed one item, but for one reason or another needed to varnish another

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  45. I need help. I painted a piece of furniture with the Annie Sloan chalk paint, and now I have a water stain on the piece. How do I get it out? Help!

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    Replies
    1. Did you seal the piece? If not then a quick sand and a repaint. If so and it was the wax you sealed it with then you should be able to just rewax, and the mark should come away. If not repaint may be your only option. Try getting the wax and just working the mark out, I've had a lot of coffee mug rings and stains come away very well just by rewaxing

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  46. Hello , I am finding your advice really interesting.Are there any tips you can provide about painting a fridge with AS paint and how to protect it.I can't see any similar questions here about painting metal like this -am I trying to do a difficult thing ?

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    Replies
    1. I think a fridge would be easy. The surface is painted or lacquered I presume and so clean it well (not sure where you are in the world but Krud Cutter, tsp, sugar soap, Flash with Bleach all good but rinse thoroughly afterwards) then paint and then you have the choice -
      wax but it will pick up and show grease
      AS lacquer which I am not keen on .....but if you have it locally might be easy
      Other varnish such as General Finishes HP topcoat or any of the Polyvine ones

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    2. Thank you so much,it gives me the confidence to have a go. I have picked up some Polyvine varnish now.I will share with you how it goes.

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  47. Hi Cait,

    very good site with some useful info. I am due to be painting an internal glazed door at the bottom of our stairs (small glass panels from top to bottom with wooden cross sections - 3 panels wide by 6 down, so there is limited wood but it is finicky. It is currently varnished and as it will be very finicky to sand I am going to use AS paint on it. Rather than wax it, could I use the AS paint to cover the current varnished surface, then prime and then gloss (I already have primer and gloss but no sand paper and no wax and figured it would be easier to paint with AS than sand it all down) I could of course just pant with AS paint and no wax but presume this would get dirty quickly as door often not shut as such and is pushed open rather than using the handle. The door will be a shade of white (currently mid brown & varnished)

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    Replies
    1. Annie Sloan Chalk Paint, isn't a primer. Use a bonding primer like Zinsser 123 that doesn't require you to sand before application. That will cut out the need for the extra coat. So either, prime and gloss using the correct primer, or Annie Sloan and wax or varnish. The system you described will work in that it will stick but it will be a nasty sandwich of instability long term IMHO ..... are making work for yourself.

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  48. Hi, I have added detail to a piece (that I have painted with chalk paint) using acrylic paint. Can I still wax this? Many thanks.

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    Replies
    1. Yes you can, just wax straight over and it will be fine. The acrylic just won't absorb as much wax as the AS will

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  49. I believe wax can be used over milk paint.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Milk Paint can be waxed, how effective the Annie Sloan Wax is over milk paint I am not sure as I have never used it. The only milk paint that doesn't need wax is the General Finishes mon

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    2. sorry that should read "...the General Finishes one"

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  50. Is it safe to put the cloths in the washing machine that I used to wipe excess Soft Wax off? I don't want to ruin my machine and can't find any information on how to wash the cloths. Thanks!

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    Replies
    1. I wash mine in the washing machine but I don't tumble dry them due to the flammable nature of the wax. I am not sure it would damage your machine....I can't thing so as the wax can be broken down with hot soapy water when cleaning brushes, but if you don't have good water pressure it may end up with a residue being left in the pipes so ,maybe think again

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  51. hi cait,was wondering if you know whether you can paint a motif ,etc with one shot enamel over ascp and also do you sand between coats of ascp.thanks

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    Replies
    1. Sorry I replied to this but it ended up as a post and not as a 'reply' because I was trying to do it from my phone and it didn't work the way I wanted it to.
      One shot is non absorbent and the wax will just slide over the top. It is also a hard medium and the ASCP a soft one so I am not convinced that it is best choice. I would go with something water based such as artists acrylic paints - the liquid ones flow easiest over ASCP. You don't have to sand for adhesion but the paint holds brushmarks so you may want to sand to get a smooth finish if that is what you are after. Thinning the second coat also helps this process.
      Hope that helps
      C

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  52. One shot is non absorbent and the wax will just slide over the top. It is also a hard medium and the ASCP a soft one so I am not convinced that it is best choice. I would go with something water based such as artists acrylic paints - the liquid ones flow easiest over ASCP. You don't have to sand for adhesion but the paint holds brushmarks so you may want to sand to get a smooth finish if that is what you are after. Thinning the second coat also helps this process.
    Hope that helps
    C

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  53. I have an old dresser that I painted/waxed the bottom half and left the top stained. There are some small scratches and natural distressing on top- wondering if I could work the wax into those areas? Any experience with putting the wax over stain? Assuming it will just wipe off but, hopeful it would settle into scratched areas.

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    Replies
    1. Should work very well, if it doesn't then just remove the wax with white spirit/mineral spirits

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  54. hi , i'm really confused! i want to paint my dining table put the wax obviously isn't a good idea for the table top? but the varnish will chip? so what do other people use? please help i'm scared of ruining our dining table, my 3 kids use it everyday. thanks

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    Replies
    1. We don't recommend ASCP any more as a tabletop finish. Not over prefinished furniture. If you are prepared to sand (best done with an electric sander) the top so that the original finish is off, then wash the top and varnish with a high quality polyacrylic then you will have a very durable finish.
      Varnish generally is the better option if you want to paint, I like General Finishes varnishes but then I have never liked Annie's varnish, I would do lots of layers of High Performance Topcoat or the Polyacrylic Topcoat

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  55. I painted a grey color and then white so that I could eventually distress and bring out the grey. Now after the first coat of white there is a yellow stain color coming through. Read on the Annie Sloan website that you can put a coat of shellac down and it will be fine for your next coat of white. My question is do I have to also do another coat of grey or will I be able to sand/distress through the shellac down to the original grey layer?

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    Replies
    1. You will need to repeat the grey....or you could try distressing the white and see if the yellow is dissipated enough to not be so noticeable. But I have an idea that you will end up just fiddling around an wishing you had started again.

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    2. Thanks Cait. I was also hoping to distress down to the original finish in some places (maybe). Is shellac the type of thing that once its on, you cant really get through it?

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    3. You want to get a clear shellac, but it will darken what is beneath it like a varnish. Shellac is french polish and is a methylated spirits based finish. It is a sort of a brittle layer and it might not sand through well.....but then again it might.
      Do you know what...why not take a small area and just try it, see if it works and then take it from there

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  56. Can I just say...you are amazing! I so appreciate the fact that you take the time to advise and encourage others giving them the courage to create their own personal masterpieces! Thank you so much!

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    1. Thank you Victoria, it is a pleasure

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  57. I would love your advice on sealing my kitchen cabinets. I am planning on painting my maple cabinets ascp old ochre or old white, light distressing and glazing. I have used dark wax to glaze before, but may try Beautiful's antique glaze? I'm not sure what to think about waxing a heavily used kitxhen's cabinets. I have small children's and a big dog who likes to jump (scratch). Could you please tell me how you would seal them and if the antiquing glaze gives a similar look as the dark wax glaze would? Thank you so much!

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    Replies
    1. I am so sorry to be so slow to get back to you Victoria...I have been working away and travelling and posting on blogger from phones and iPad always seems not to work very well.
      First of all if you use AS paint it is the type of paint that will wear and build character over time. It is not the sort of finish that is pristine and crisp like an eggshell.
      I would recommend Beautiful to work with as I think that a varnish and a glaze are going to be more durable for your family life. Mindy Harrell runs the company and is really approachable and honest to deal with. I have to say I have never used the products as they are US only products. But I would not doubt for a second their efficacy knowing Mindy and I have been given really good reports about them.

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  58. Can I use the AS dark wax on my stair rail- I want it to be richer looking with a little aged look;). It is already stained - any suggestions??

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    1. Yes I think that is a a good way to go. Easy to apply as well

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  59. Cait - I am going to paint a laminated office desk with Chalk paint and need to seal it. I think a varnish might be better than the wax as I will be working on the desk a lot with paper products etc. Ilive in UK - can you please recommend the best varnish to get to give a really smooth fiish (I don't want the distressed look) - thank you x

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    1. Hi Claire,
      I like General Finishes varnishes try the Polyacrylic Blend http://www.generalfinishes.co.uk/index.cfm?page=store&CID=24
      or the high perfomance top coat http://www.generalfinishes.co.uk/index.cfm?page=store&CID=27
      applying with a paint pad which they also supply will give you a beautiful smooth finish.
      http://www.generalfinishes.co.uk/index.cfm?page=store&action=viewProduct&CID=32&PID=1066
      If you phone through your order and mention that you have been referred by Carte Blanche you may get some bits and bobs free, like some applicators Phone: +441316615553

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    2. sorry...you will have to copy and paste those links....they won't go clickable

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  60. Hi, I cannot see that anyone else has asked this question, so apologies if I have totally missed it ! I am planning to paint the EXTERIOR of my wood sash windows in ASCP, but am having trouble finding the correct sealer to go over the top - can you recommend anything? thanks :)

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  61. Hi Corinne, I have never recommended Chalk Paint for exterior windows although Annie Sloan HQ reckons it's OK. I feel the paint is not suitable for this purpose but if you are looking for the faded flaky french look you may be good to go.
    The recommendation for exterior woodwork is to ensure that the surface is thoroughly dry and then allow it to dry and cure over a 7-10 day period, normally with furniture we suggest taking it indoors. It should not be sealed.
    Since windows are fixed and the weather in UK (especially Scotland) pretty unpredictable, they can't be taken somewhere dry to cure and must try to cure in potentially high humidity if not steady rain. We have had a number of people come back to us with issues painting windows and doors. None of them had bought or had their advice from me.
    When I first bought ASCP it was in Blegium and made to a slightly different formula and it did very very well outside, since it was made in UK it was in my experience less successful.
    As things stand the advice is not to seal as I said.
    I would sincerely suggest that you test the paint first and see how well it fares in your environment. You may also want to ask some of your stockists if they have customers who have used it outside and maybe find out how it went.
    Sorry not to be uber positive, I think my painting and decorating training also makes me think that if you are painting windows, which is a fiddly job anyway...why not just paint it in an exterior grade paint designed for the purpose.
    Whatever paint you decide to use, if you live in a town or near the sea you must make sure that the surface is clean of traffic film or salt

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    1. Hi thanks for replying. I really haven't found a colour that I like, and its the sanding and priming on very long ladders that was also making me veer towards chalk paint as its less time spent at the top of a very long ladder for me:( but thanks for advice anyway.

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    2. Corinne, why do you need to prime are they already painted? If they are already painted then you need to clean, remove the flakey old paint and prime only exposed timber. You would need to do the first 2 stages for any paint. Then you should sand to create a key...this doesn't mean heavy sanding it just means sanding to scratch the surface and then apply a compatible paint with what is on there already.
      How do you know what is compatible? Rub it with a cloth with methylated spirits on it, if the paint softens and some is held on the cloth it is water based. If that is what it is, use a water based paint...if not, oil based. If you hate oil based then use a paint that has a high adhesion level
      Buy a good quality paint and that will make it easier, Little Green make a great exterior grade acrylic primer that you can have tinted to the colour you want that will adhere to oil based paint and if you are looking for low sheen water based then their Intelligent Eggshell is so good to use. If you are looking for something that you don't need to undercoat and has a great adhesion then General Finishes Milk Paint (which isn't really a Milk Paint but a hight adhesion acrylic paint).
      Both of these options if the paint you already have is fairly solid will only require a good clean and a nice light sand to key the paint.

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  62. Hi Cait- your advice looks most helpful :) I'm wanting to paint a dark wood stained dressing table to sell so I'm wanting to get it right! Firstly I've chosen the Antoinette colour but do not want to go through a whole tin doing it especially with ASCP being expensive. Would painting it in AS white as a first coat give better coverage before applying the pink? I'm going to distress it a little with sandpaper to reveal the original dark stain. from what I'm reading, as the dressing table is going to be sold, I don't want to tell them they may have to re-wax top if they are rough or heavy handed with dresser top as it may turn them off purchasing......So if I seal it rather than wax dresser ( with a laquer ) would this make the paint work more durable? If so,what type of sealer would you recommend? I live in Australia so I'm not sure if you are familiar with brands ? I'd hate to have an unhappy buyer complaining of paint flaking off - Can I use other brands besides ASCP sealer ? Looking forward to hearing from you :) Sonia- PS: not every State in Australia stocks ASCP and shipping is $20 so this is the reason for being so stingy with purchasing ASCP LoL

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    1. Hi Sonia, White in any range tends to have the worst coverage so if you want to use white as a first coat, I would only do it if I wanted to incorporate it into the finish.
      I always tell my customers that they should treat painted furniture as if it was an antique. The wax does need maintained so it sounds like a lacquer is the better option. I have never made it a secret that I don't like the Annie Sloan lacquer so I would go with a good quality polyacrylic varnish if I was you. I am not familiar at ALL with your brands in Australia so I cannot advise. The one thing I would point out is that if you don't use an AS brand topcoat, then you cannot go back to them if you have an issue....this is the one advantage of staying in system.
      So there are a few ways to go....use the wax, and sell your customer the concept of maintaining her piece with wax. You could say "I have given you a small amount of the cleaning and maintenance wax that will help you keep your furniture looking in tip top condition" and decant a little wax into a pot with some brief instructions - that way they feel they are getting something for nothing and the maintenance isn't an issue.
      Or you could varnish/lacquer and say nothing. Using AS varnish means you have comeback. be aware that lacquer and varnish may change the colour a little.
      If you are going to use something out of brand test it first so you are happy with it.
      The one thing they need to watch for is alcohol, it makes no difference which material you seal it with alcohol will eat through so perfumes etc. are what should be kept off the surface.

      You need to advise them that alcohol will

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  63. *********PLEASE NOTE THAT WE ARE NO LONGER TAKING QUESTIONS ON ANNIE SLOAN PAINT. WE ARE NO LONGER STOCKISTS AND SINCE THE PAINT HAS CHANGED A LITTLE IN UK SINCE WE WERE USING IT REGULARLY WE FEEL UNABLE TO GIVE ACCURATE ADVICE ABOUT THE PAINT. WE SUGGEST CONTACTING YOUR LOCAL SUPPLIER OR HEAD OFFICE OXFORD FOR ACCURATE UP TO DATE TECHNICAL INFORMATION**********

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